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                Pipes Digest #288 -- July 24, 2004
   Copyright (C) 2004 by Steven J. Beaty. All rights reserved.
               Commercial use of any part of contents,
              including email addresses, is prohibited.

                   Circulation this issue: 3401

Today's Topics:
        Pipe smoking and yoga
        Re: Pipes Digest #287
        Filling in the Blanks
        help
        Concerning the "Professor's Pipe-Sweetening Technique"
        couple of questions
        introduction

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Date: Fri, 23 Jul 2004 12:54:42 -0600 (MDT)
From: ????????????????????
Subject: Pipe smoking and yoga

Dear Steve and other pipe friends,
These two activities are completely incompatible!!!!!
I know you were expecting that I would link them, and I shall.
I teach about 150 yoga students a week, and I smoke about 6 bowls of tobacco 
a YEAR.  That is not very much tobacco, so a can lasts me and lasts me and 
lasts me.
HOWEVER, I really love to smoke my pipe with blends that have both perique 
and latikia in them.  
After I smoke some tobacco, I feel very relaxed and mellow and my meditation 
is very deep.  I don't do this combination very often so as to keep it 
special, but it is really great.
My favorite pipe is a small meershaum bent bulldog that I bought for myself 
after winning a talent show playing the classical guitar.  Second favorite is a 
Preben Holm freehand briar.  The bowl is a bit deep and when I smoke it down 
to the bottom, it starts to slurp and sometimes I take a drink.  I put up with 
it, though because it's a great smoke in the upper floors.
My next favorite is a big old Calabash.  Since I'm an outdoor smoker, I can 
only smoke this one when the risk of condensation is minimal so that I won't 
damage the gourd.
Wishing you all the best,
John Giunta
Rev. John Giunta, Yoga and Music Ministry

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Date: Fri, 23 Jul 2004 09:44:30 -0600 (MDT)
From: Mike McCormick <???????????????????>
Subject: Re: Pipes Digest #287

re "the Pipe" up here in Portland Or the Pipe and the
Smoke pipes were sold In Fred Meyer stores in fact i
have 6 of them i use them to check out new tobacco.
Cheer's Mike McCormick

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Date: Mon, 26 Jul 2004 22:28:34 +1000
From: "Norman Lever" <?????????????????????????>
Subject: Filling in the Blanks

I was very pleased to receive the latest pipes digest, but was
disappointed with the (lack of) content. I was surprised to see
commercial advertising published as well. I decided that I could either
be part of the problem by complaining, or part of the solution by
sending in content. So;

"The Professor's Pipe-Sweetening Technique"

As I read the query from Randy Hogue in the last Pipes Digest regarding
this method, I actually had three pipes 'on-the-go' with the
aforementioned technique.

My experience has been very good with this method. I use Isopropyl
Alcohol that I get from a distributor of MG Chemicals, a Canadian
manufacturer. This product is 98.5% pure and works very well. I don't
use ethanol (methylated spirits) as it smells vile, or any drinking
spirits as the high water content would cause the bowl to crack.

In my experience, using the above product, there's practically no chance
of cracking. This is because the alcohol is anhydrous and therefore does
not affect the moisture level of the wood. If it becomes too moist, the
heating from use may crack the bowl and too dry may shrink and crack the
stem. The method, though, does recommend removal of the stem during the
process.

I have found that it is useful to ream the char in the bowl down to the
desired level before starting, and sometimes with a really heavily used
pipe it may need to be done twice or even three times before it is
useable. Judge by how brown and nasty the salt turns.

When done, the pipe should be cleaned out to remove the salt, checked to
make sure it's not moist (in which case, use more salt to absorb the
moisture and allow to dry), then rested for a day or two to allow the
moisture level and other cake-embedded chemicals to settle before use.
DON'T put it somewhere warm to speed it up, you may crack the bowl. Just
let nature run its course and you will end up with a restored old
friend.

"Peterson Dental Stem"

Sam Mikhail's comments about Peterson's p-lip were probably founded on
his experience of Peterson pipes. I have found that Peterson are not
exactly the most 'aggressive' marketers and so there isn't much
information at tobacconists about them. However, they do make three
types of mouthpieces.

The standard type of bit in the industry is a flattened, flared
mouthpiece which Peterson call the 'Fishtail' bit. This is what everyone
uses in one form or another.

The Peterson P-Lip is their own invention. It is rounded with a ridge at
the end for tooth-grip and has the smoke hole on the top of the bit
instead of the end. The rationale is that the 'hotter' smokes do not get
drawn directly onto the tongue but up and over to reduce tongue-bite.

The third and most recent innovation is the 'Dental' lip. This is
another Peterson invention and is a straight bit (only fitted to
straight styles) and looks from the side a bit like an upside-down
hairpin. The top is straight with a small tooth-grip ridge, but the
underside has deep ridges / waves and ends with a very large ridge.  It's
supposed to reduce stress on teeth (or dentures) caused by holding the
pipe. How it does this I'm not sure, but I think the idea is that if it
wedges in place with the ridges, it requires less jaw pressure to hold.

There should be pictures of these on Peterson's website:
http://www.peterson.ie <http://www.peterson.ie/>

"Pipe Refurbishment"

Darryll Barksdale, whose first name my spell-checker is having a
hissy-fit over (it's also spitting one over the word 'hissy') asked for
advice on pipe refurbishment. My best advice is to do as little as
possible to the pipe to make it useable. Very often, something will go
badly wrong when you've nearly finished and write it off after hours of
work.

Here's some simple advice. Don't use machines when hands will do. A
machine can burn through a pipe stem in half the time it takes to
hand-polish it and rip the finish off a bowl in the blink of an eye.

What would I do? First, separate bowl and stem. Then ream bowl cake to
desired thickness and use the Professor's Pipe-Sweetening Technique to
de-ick the bowl. When ready and dried, sniff it. Some tobaccos leave
smells that just can't be removed (like Latakia) so only use it for
those.

Next, clean the rim with well-diluted alcohol and a soft cloth, to
remove tar but not the finish. Clean the inside of the air-hole with a
shank-brush (like a very small bottle-brush) and pipecleaner. Then
polish the bowl by hand with a soft cloth and maybe beeswax.

The stem should be cleaned inside with alcohol-soaked pipeleaners until
they come out clean. Polish the outside by hand with nothing more
abrasive than toothpaste, which can be cleanly rinsed off with lukewarm
water. You can hand wax the stem with either beeswax or an automotive
wax (NOT a polish, it's abrasive).

Allow both bowl and stem to dry out separately in a cool, dry place,
then re-assemble and use.

"B&M"

I've often seen this term bandied about on ASP and can't work it out.
I'm assuming it's an Americanism for a tobacconist, however as we call
them 'tobacconists' here I'm at a loos to work out what the B or M are
for. Enlightenment would stop me thinking of rude word combinations for
this term.

Well, there's about a page and a half of filler for the next issue.
Hopefully some of your regular contributors will add their good
comments, as they do, and we'll have a nice wad of reading material.

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Date: Thu, 29 Jul 2004 08:31:06 -0600 (MDT)
From: Richard Kaminski <?????????????????????>
Subject: help

Glad to see the Pipes Digest back up and running.  I have a question though.
The last Digest I received before we went off to Volumes and Issue #'s
(received via ??????????????????????? <mailto:???????????????????????> ) was
282 and then the next one I received just recently was 286.  Were there ever
any issues numbered 283, 284, or 285?  
 
Keep up the good work!
 
Cheers,
Richard

[ those issues are now up on the pipes.org web page... ]

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Date: Thu, 29 Jul 2004 18:09:53 +0200
From: Stefano Toria <????????????????>
Subject: Concerning the "Professor's Pipe-Sweetening Technique"

>Date: Wed, 16 Jun 2004 16:13:12 -0400
>From: "Hogue, Randy {Document Control- Osmetech}" <????????????????????????>
>Subject: Concerning the "Professor's Pipe-Sweetening Technique"
>
>Concerning the "Professor's Pipe-Sweetening Technique" - has anyone
>actually tried it with success and is there any real danger of cracking
>the stem by drying the briar too much?
>
>Randy D. Hogue
>
>?????????????????????????

I had never heard of the Professor, or of his Pipe-Sweetening
Technique, but I have been using an almost identical procedure, except
that instead of pure alcohol I have been using clear-coloured spirits
such as gin or vodka.

I guess that the pure alcohol might be better in that it would not
leave any tang behind.

Anyway I have never had any problem with this procedure. And it is
true that it takes away any funny taste from the pipes.

Smoke in peace,

Stefano

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Date: Wed, 11 Aug 2004 13:40:42 -0500
From: "douglas herbert" <??????????????????????>
Subject: couple of questions

wassail, all:

First, thanks so much for getting the list back up and running.  I've missed 
it terribly.

Second, the professor's pipe sweetening technique saved my Brebbia, which i 
love nearly as much as my wife.  I cannot recomend it enough.  I got ahold 
of some nasty tobbaco from a local tobbaco shop that soured all of my pipes. 
  i managed to get all of them but my Brebbia sweetened with normal 
cleaning, but the Brebbia i thought was gone forever.  But now i have it 
back, and i never buy from that tobbacanist anymore.  The way i see it, if i 
can't smoke a pipe because it's rancid, then what do i have to lose?  if it 
dries up and cracks, well, i wasn't able to smoke it anyway, was I?

Also, several years ago, i got a pipe from an estate sale.  It was obviously 
never smoked.  It came in a box, which has "Don Roberto" and "Jolly Boy 
Pipe"  on it.  In the box is also a box of matches that says "Hiland's 
Tobacco Locker"  (my brilliant deductive skills say that this is where the 
pipe was bought;-), and on the back it says "Official Queen Mary 
Tobacconist"  with a picture of the Queen Mary ocean liner.  It must have 
been bought on the ship, during a vacation or something.  On one side of the 
stem it says "310 Italy"  and has a shield with an "S" in the shield and a ^ 
above the shield.  On the other side of the stem are the letters "HTL"  
(Hilands Tobacco Locker, perhaps?) and "Stag".  That must be the type of 
pipe.  I tried to smoke it once, and it was awful, so now it's simply a 
look'n at piece.  I have no idea how old it is.  Does anyone have any idea 
of what kind of pipe, possible value, or any other kind of information for 
me?  Also, there is a serial number typed onto the box, so if anyone has any 
idea of what company made it, or how to get in touch with them, i could 
maybe get more info.  thanks a lot, all, any info is appreciated.

doug herbert


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Date: Thu, 7 Oct 2004 22:16:04 -0600 (MDT)
From: "Martin Rude" <?????????????????????>
Subject: introduction

Hi Steve and all. I hope this finds everyone well. About a year or more ago, 
I think it was, I stumbled onto the archives of Pipes Digest and enjoyed it 
thouroughly. Then I recently thought I'd go back and do the same and 
discovered some significant changes. For one, I couldn't just lurk the way I 
had. I actually seemed to have to sign up, to a certain degree, just to read 
Pipes Digest. Well I thought I had lurked long enough anyway so here's a bit 
of an intro and bio.   Even when I was young, I always hated the smell of 
cigarettes. On the other hand I allways liked the fragrance of cigars and 
pipes. I didn't even ever consider smoking until I was in my early 20s. At 
that time I lived in a house in Saskatoon with 7 other room-mates. They all 
smoked cigarettes! Every one of them! Can you imagine how that house smelled 
to someone who didn't like the smell of cigarettes? So I went out to a local 
smoke shop and bought myself a Brigham bent billiard and some rasberry 
flavoured tobacco called 'flambe'. Sort of a french pronunciation. Took me a 
while to get used to it. It did seem to help mask the cigarette stench. I've 
had that pipe ever since. I'm now 45. It still gets smoked some. Last winter 
I found a couple of estate pipes and enjoyed cleaning them up for use. So 
now I have 3 pipes. I supose none of them are super high dollar smokers but 
along with those estate pipes was 1 real cheapee. It smokes terribly. Makes 
one appreciate the better ones. Now I haven't smoked a lot even though I 
have had a pipe for so many years. And even when I do smoke what I consider 
alot it's only about a bowl or so a week. I have some strange smoking habits 
for a pipe smoker.I find that when the pipe is first loaded I can't keep it 
lit very well. But the next day it stays lit much better and I can smoke 
nice and slow to keep it cool. Even wierder, I can enjoy that same bowl for 
a few days. I don't seem to need a lot. I guess I enjoy the flavour as much 
as anything and enjoy a few puffs morning and afternoon before I get on my 
school bus. Then I can enjoy the aftertaste while I drive.    Lately I have 
been smoking some sweet virginia flake which I rub out fine before packing.  
My other tobacco is some old Argosy Black which I have been carefully 
keeping humidified fo a few years.  I live in Canada so tobacco is VERY 
expensive.   So much for now.    Here's wishing you calm days,      Banjo.   
  Oh, When I'm not driving that bus, I am a barber, Hair dresser, Or guitar 
teacher depending on the time of day.

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Article Index

  1. Subject: Pipes Digest #288
  2. Subject: Pipe smoking and yoga
  3. Subject: Re: Pipes Digest #287
  4. Subject: Filling in the Blanks
  5. Subject: help
  6. Subject: Concerning the "Professor's Pipe-Sweetening Technique"
  7. Subject: couple of questions
  8. Subject: introduction
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